Monday, October 22, 2018

Exit Interview: Lauren Ambrose Says Goodbye to Eliza but Hopes to Keep the Boots by Alexis Soloski

Sharing stories of a professionally thrilling Broadway role in “My Fair Lady” that coincided with personal loss.

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Critic’s Pick: Review: A Song of Eternity in ‘Midnight at the Never Get’ by Laura Collins-Hughes

It’s 1963 again, and this chamber musical packs all the heartbreak and bliss of love in a Village gay bar of the era.

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Sunday, October 21, 2018

Critic’s Pick: Review: A Thrilling ‘Ferryman’ Serves Up a Glorious Harvest Feast by Ben Brantley

Jez Butterworth’s great, sprawling drama of rural Northern Ireland during the Troubles bares a culture’s contradictions through riveting storytelling.

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Review: A Song of Eternity in ‘Midnight at the Never Get’ by Laura Collins-Hughes

It’s 1963 again, and this chamber musical packs all the heartbreak and bliss of love in a Village gay bar of the era.

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Friday, October 19, 2018

Not Just for Grown-Ups: The Broadway Audience Is Getting Younger by Michael Paulson

The average age of the Broadway theatergoer last season was 40.6 — the lowest since 2000, the Broadway League says, and 15 percent of theatergoers were under 18.

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This Playwright Has Been Listening to Her Mother by Sopan Deb

Jaclyn Backhaus’s new play sounds like the story of a Punjabi-American of her generation, and it is. But it also draws on her mother’s fraught family.

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The Week in Arts: ‘Wildlife,’ Terence McNally, American Ballet Theater by The New York Times

With barely contained fury, Carey Mulligan stars as a Montana housewife in Paul Dano’s directorial debut.

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Theater Review: In Paris, Justice Takes Center Stage by Laura Cappelle

Justice — its rhetoric and its travails — is at the heart of several new theater productions in Paris.

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Thursday, October 18, 2018

Review: ‘Gloria: A Life,’ Starring Ms. Steinem and Her Audience by Jesse Green

Emily Mann’s stage biography of the feminist trailblazer is more of a historical pageant than a play, but what happens at the end is riveting drama.

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Review: A Three-Way Smackdown Over ‘The Lifespan of a Fact’ by Jesse Green

When a gassy essayist and a pesky researcher are forced together by a crusading editor you get a topical comedy with a lot to prove.

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Clay Aiken and Ruben Studdard Reunite in a Broadway Holiday Show by Danya Issawi

The two former “American Idol” rivals will be in a limited-run show that opens in December at the Imperial Theater.

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15 Plays and Musicals to Go to in N.Y.C. This Weekend by Alexis Soloski

Previews, openings and some last-chance picks.

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Pull Up a Seat. Two Plays, Dinner and Western History Are Served. by Eric Grode

A downtown theater has cleared the house to make room for Samuel D. Hunter’s pairing “Lewiston/Clarkston.”

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Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Review: Glenn Close Raises a Saint in ‘Mother of the Maid’ by Ben Brantley

In Jane Anderson’s satisfyingly old-fashioned play about Joan of Arc’s mom, Ms. Close shows the stuff of which great stage stars are made.

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Review: Sex, Lies and Vindication in a Most Timely ‘Measure for Measure’ by Laura Collins-Hughes

The heroine’s impossible position could hardly be more sympathetic or central than in this Pushkin Theater Moscow/Cheek by Jowl staging.

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Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Review: Stockard Channing Is a Mother to Remember in ‘Apologia’ by Ben Brantley

Portraying a celebrated art historian with two resentful sons, Ms. Channing finds the anguished heart in a didactic comic drama.

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New York City to Help Small Theaters Be More Accessible by Michael Paulson

Grants will provide closed captioning of spoken words, or audio description of action, on mobile devices, in a way that is not distracting to other patrons.

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A Playwright’s LSD Trip Becomes a Psychedelic Journey by Matt Trueman

The British playwright Leo Butler believes that taking acid can have beneficial effects. His new play explores how he thinks it can help.

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‘The Ferryman’ Shows a Dark Irish Chapter Through a Personal Lens by Laura Collins-Hughes

It took persuading, but Jez Butterworth wrote his new play for his partner, Laura Donnelly, both to honor her history and give her a great part.

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This Broadway Season, the Play’s Really the Thing by Michael Paulson

In a turnabout no one expected, New York’s most prominent stages are rich with drama, most of it new and most of it American.

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Business Is Boo-ing! The World of Extreme Haunts by Nicole Pajer

Americans are paying to scare themselves witless, and not just on Halloween.

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Review: O, for a Muse of Fire, or a Comptroller, to Save ‘Popcorn Falls’ by Alexis Soloski

Armed with money for a theater (which doesn’t exist) to save his town, a mayor tries his hand at playwriting in this two-actor, multicharacter comedy.

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A Marathon of New Plays Gives an Epic Start to Munich’s Theater Season by A.j. Goldmann

“Dionysos Stadt” is a 10-hour epic inspired by the Greek classics that traces the arc of human drama. It’s just one of many new productions on Munich’s stages.

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The Week in Arts: James Brown Tribute, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Berlioz at Carnegie by The New York Times

The Apollo Theater celebrates 50 years after “Say It Loud — I’m Black and I’m Proud.”

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Critic’s Notebook: Enraged by Their Times, Women of Ambition Seize the Stage by Laura Collins-Hughes

Three eras, three plays drawn from real life. But the same old double standard.

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A Word With: Taye Diggs Has a New Title: Football Coach by Kathryn Shattuck

Mr. Diggs talks about his new CW series, “All American”; football and Colin Kaepernick; and a nagging question about identity.

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She’s 17, Sardonic and Ready to Sing in ‘Beetlejuice’ by Alexis Soloski

Condescend at your own risk to Sophia Anne Caruso, the go-to girl for adventurous stage roles. “Even from a young age,” she says, “I had very finicky taste.”

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Encounters: Mercedes Ruehl Takes Weekly Strolls With Her Acting Students by Alexis Soloski

The actress, who stars in the Broadway revival of “Torch Song,” is an acting teacher and mentor.

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Carol Hall, ‘Best Little Whorehouse’ Composer, Is Dead at 82 by Neil Genzlinger

Ms. Hall was a moderately successful songwriter until she and two collaborators came up with one of the biggest Broadway hits of the 1970s.

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Review: In ‘Travisville,’ the Rocky Path of Change in a Southern Town by Elisabeth Vincentelli

William Jackson Harper’s polished debut as a playwright, set in 1964, pits patient negotiation against disruptive activism.

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Review: Remembering the Way It Was (Not) in ‘The Things That Were There’ by Ben Brantley

David Greenspan’s tone poem of a play, at the Bushwick Starr, considers time, death, family and the ways in which we recall our dead.

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