Thursday, January 18, 2018

Men Dominate French Theater, but Talented Women Abound by Laura Cappelle

The proportion of French plays written and directed by women is low. But four Paris productions show a great diversity of talent.

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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

New York Finally Gets Its ‘Jerry Springer’ Moment by Margaret Lyons

With a reality TV star in the White House and ’90s nostalgia in full flower, the controversial 2003 musical about the famed talk show host arrives.

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Fighting for Native Americans, in Court and Onstage by Laura Collins-Hughes

In her new play “Sovereignty,” Mary Kathryn Nagle brings together her legal activism and her family history.

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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Russian Theater Director’s House Arrest Is Extended by Oleg Matsnev

Kirill S. Serebrennikov has been under suspicion of embezzling a sum equal to $2.3 million.

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Review: Richard Maxwell Considers Life After Life in ‘Paradiso’ by Ben Brantley

In the bleak and buoyant “Paradiso,” a world beyond human existence is summoned with stark sentimentality and endless eloquence.

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Monday, January 15, 2018

Critic’s Notebook: Can Art Change the World? With Song, Dance and Cowboy Clichés Two Shows Offer Different Answers by Alexis Soloski

“Parable of the Sower” is an earnest call to action, while the irreverent “Pursuit of Happiness” finds a Slovenian dance troupe in unfamiliar territory.

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Review: ‘Undesirable Elements,’ Documentary Theater for Uncivil Times by Laura Collins-Hughes

In this gentle, humane show by Ping Chong + Company, young New Yorkers share their real-life victories and fears.

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Review: Hipsters Double-Check Their Privilege in ‘Cute Activist’ by Jesse Green

A new comedy at the Bushwick Starr satirizes 20-somethings, gentrifiers, landlords and activists. In other words, Bushwick.

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Study Finds Increasing Diversity on Broadway by Andrew R. Chow

The Asian American Performers Action Coalition found that in the 2015-16 season, 35 percent of all roles went to minority actors — up from 30 percent the year before.

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Sunday, January 14, 2018

Review: A Fantasy Town Builds a Wall Against Time in ‘Ballyturk’ by Ben Brantley

Enda Walsh’s wild cosmic farce, in which two men act out the life of a fantasy village, finds the aching emptiness in words, words, words

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Review: Without Singing, the Moth Hits the High Notes in ‘The Echo Drift’ by Laura Collins-Hughes

Stark, intricate and often exciting, the two-character chamber opera finds a prisoner tormented by the insect in her cell.

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Friday, January 12, 2018

City Center to Honor Michael Friedman by Joshua Barone

The theater’s Off-Center series, which Mr. Friedman led until his death last year, will stage his 2003 musical “Gone Missing” in July.

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For Lorraine Hansberry, ‘A Raisin in the Sun’ Was Just the Start by Salamishah Tillet

The new documentary “Sighted Eyes/Feeling Heart” explores a more complex and complicated playwright than the civil rights figure known to most people.

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Critic’s Notebook: How to Listen to Rock ’n’ Roll in a Theater by Elisabeth Vincentelli

Rock is underexplored onstage, but two Under the Radar shows, “How to Be a Rock Critic” and “The Hendrix Project,” grapple with its transformative power.

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Review: Who Am I? ‘Panorama’ Says There Is No Easy Answer by Ben Brantley

In this multimedia, multidimensional performance piece, the boundaries of race, gender and ethnicity blur into a shifting pageant of identity.

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Thursday, January 11, 2018

Review: Surprise Lessons From John Lithgow’s ‘Stories by Heart’ by Jesse Green

In a touching tribute to his father and the tradition of reading aloud, Mr. Lithgow recites two classic tales of deception and comeuppance.

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5 Shows to See if You’re in New York in January by Ben Brantley

For the new year, productions that aim to shake up your senses and challenge your assumptions. Plus: ’80s jargon and hair.

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Three Journeys Under the Radar: Trippy, Unsettling and Affectionate

Audiences at the Public Theater’s festival of experimental theater can hallucinate, watch a Cuban “Antigone” or get nostalgic with a New Yorker writer.

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Josie Rourke and Kate Pakenham to Depart London’s Donmar Warehouse by Anna Codrea-Rado

Ms. Rourke, the artistic director, will leave in 2019 and Ms. Pakenham, the executive producer, will leave in June.

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The Royal Shakespeare Company Goes to Rome, With Mixed Results by Matt Wolf

There were highs and lows in a triptych of Shakespearean plays set in ancient Rome at the Barbican Theater in London.

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Wednesday, January 10, 2018

Review: ‘Electric Lucifer,’ or the Passion of the Bleep Bloop Beep by Alexis Soloski

Take two electronic music concept albums. Add a glamorous performer and lots of spandex. The result: a rock opera battle for the soul of the universe.

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New Yorkers Making Up Bigger Portion of Broadway Audience by Michael Paulson

Other findings from a report on the 2016-17 season: Crowds remain white and predominantly female, but more young people are attending.

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Adrienne Kennedy, Playwright: Still Quiet, Still Bold, Still Furious by Alexis Soloski

Her new Jim Crow-era play, “He Brought Her Heart Back in Box,” shows that even late in an influential career, she’s not mellowing.

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Review: Dancing to Destruction in Enda Walsh’s Fierce ‘Disco Pigs’ by Ben Brantley

This harrowing and exhilarating revival, featuring an inexhaustible cast of two, summons the agonies and ecstasies of being 17 in a blighted Irish town.

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Tuesday, January 9, 2018

John Lithgow, on Barnstorming His Way to Broadway by John Lithgow

For nine years, this actor has taken his one-man show on the road like a “time-warp vaudevillian.” What did he learn along the way?

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Inside the Battle for Arthur Miller’s Archive by Jennifer Schuessler

After a discreet tug-of-war with the playwright’s estate and Yale, the University of Texas has acquired the papers, including an “Aladdin’s cave” of unpublished material.

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Broadway San Diego Moves to End Ties With Ben Vereen by Sopan Deb

After a New York Daily News report detailed sexual misconduct allegations against Mr. Vereen, Broadway San Diego removed his name from an awards program.

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He Made Kids’ Music and Albums About Lucifer. Now His Work Is a Rock Opera. by Elisabeth Vincentelli

The psychedelic work of Bruce Haack, an electronic-music pioneer who died in 1988, is coming to the stage.

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Critic’s Notebook: In Solo Shows, Lip-Syncing ‘Hamlet’ and Investigating Home Movies by Jesse Green

At the 14th Under the Radar festival, artists working with found audio and video stretch the boundaries of theater.

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Monday, January 8, 2018

Review: In ‘Mankind,’ Men Are Men and Women Are Extinct by Jesse Green

Robert O’Hara’s latest satire takes on too many targets as it imagines a future world in which men still ruin everything.

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3 Promising Musical Theater Writers Receive $100,000 Prizes by Peter Libbey

This year’s Kleban Prizes go to Alan Schmuckler, Amanda Yesnowitz, and Christian Duhamel.

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