Thursday, October 18, 2018

Pull Up a Seat. Two Plays, Dinner and Western History Are Served. by Eric Grode

A downtown theater has cleared the house to make room for Samuel D. Hunter’s pairing “Lewiston/Clarkston.”

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Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Review: Glenn Close Raises a Saint in ‘Mother of the Maid’ by Ben Brantley

In Jane Anderson’s satisfyingly old-fashioned play about Joan of Arc’s mom, Ms. Close shows the stuff of which great stage stars are made.

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Review: Sex, Lies and Vindication in a Most Timely ‘Measure for Measure’ by Laura Collins-Hughes

The heroine’s impossible position could hardly be more sympathetic or central than in this Pushkin Theater Moscow/Cheek by Jowl staging.

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Tuesday, October 16, 2018

Review: Stockard Channing Is a Mother to Remember in ‘Apologia’ by Ben Brantley

Portraying a celebrated art historian with two resentful sons, Ms. Channing finds the anguished heart in a didactic comic drama.

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New York City to Help Small Theaters Be More Accessible by Michael Paulson

Grants will provide closed captioning of spoken words, or audio description of action, on mobile devices, in a way that is not distracting to other patrons.

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A Playwright’s LSD Trip Becomes a Psychedelic Journey by Matt Trueman

The British playwright Leo Butler believes that taking acid can have beneficial effects. His new play explores how he thinks it can help.

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‘The Ferryman’ Shows a Dark Irish Chapter Through a Personal Lens by Laura Collins-Hughes

It took persuading, but Jez Butterworth wrote his new play for his partner, Laura Donnelly, both to honor her history and give her a great part.

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This Broadway Season, the Play’s Really the Thing by Michael Paulson

In a turnabout no one expected, New York’s most prominent stages are rich with drama, most of it new and most of it American.

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Business Is Boo-ing! The World of Extreme Haunts by Nicole Pajer

Americans are paying to scare themselves witless, and not just on Halloween.

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Review: O, for a Muse of Fire, or a Comptroller, to Save ‘Popcorn Falls’ by Alexis Soloski

Armed with money for a theater (which doesn’t exist) to save his town, a mayor tries his hand at playwriting in this two-actor, multicharacter comedy.

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A Marathon of New Plays Gives an Epic Start to Munich’s Theater Season by A.j. Goldmann

“Dionysos Stadt” is a 10-hour epic inspired by the Greek classics that traces the arc of human drama. It’s just one of many new productions on Munich’s stages.

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The Week in Arts: James Brown Tribute, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Berlioz at Carnegie by The New York Times

The Apollo Theater celebrates 50 years after “Say It Loud — I’m Black and I’m Proud.”

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Critic’s Notebook: Enraged by Their Times, Women of Ambition Seize the Stage by Laura Collins-Hughes

Three eras, three plays drawn from real life. But the same old double standard.

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A Word With: Taye Diggs Has a New Title: Football Coach by Kathryn Shattuck

Mr. Diggs talks about his new CW series, “All American”; football and Colin Kaepernick; and a nagging question about identity.

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She’s 17, Sardonic and Ready to Sing in ‘Beetlejuice’ by Alexis Soloski

Condescend at your own risk to Sophia Anne Caruso, the go-to girl for adventurous stage roles. “Even from a young age,” she says, “I had very finicky taste.”

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Encounters: Mercedes Ruehl Takes Weekly Strolls With Her Acting Students by Alexis Soloski

The actress, who stars in the Broadway revival of “Torch Song,” is an acting teacher and mentor.

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Carol Hall, ‘Best Little Whorehouse’ Composer, Is Dead at 82 by Neil Genzlinger

Ms. Hall was a moderately successful songwriter until she and two collaborators came up with one of the biggest Broadway hits of the 1970s.

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Review: In ‘Travisville,’ the Rocky Path of Change in a Southern Town by Elisabeth Vincentelli

William Jackson Harper’s polished debut as a playwright, set in 1964, pits patient negotiation against disruptive activism.

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Review: Remembering the Way It Was (Not) in ‘The Things That Were There’ by Ben Brantley

David Greenspan’s tone poem of a play, at the Bushwick Starr, considers time, death, family and the ways in which we recall our dead.

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Review: Aasif Mandvi Makes You Want to Stop at ‘Sakina’s Restaurant’ by Elisabeth Vincentelli

Mr. Mandvi, who spent nearly 10 years as a correspondent on “The Daily Show,” brings back his solo comedy act. It returns with new resonance.

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Review: A Put-Upon Nanny Erupts in Todd Solondz’s ‘Emma and Max’ by Ben Brantley

This strident satire from the filmmaker behind “Happiness” and “Wiener-Dog” is perfectly staged — and all too obvious.

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Critic’s Pick: Review: ‘Rags Parkland’ Plays the Interplanetary Homesick Blues by Alexis Soloski

A folk concert provides the scaffolding for this stealthily moving sci-fi musical.

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Review: In ‘Fireflies,’ the Preacher’s Wife Gets Her Say by Jesse Green

Donja R. Love’s fantasia on the married life of a great civil rights orator suggests the price paid by the woman who gives him his voice.

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Tom Stoppard, Always Tackling ‘The Hard Problem’ by Alexis Soloski

Can a drama about the nature of consciousness be emotional, too? For its latest production, he’s tinkered with the script to firmly answer yes.

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Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Review: The Ages of A.R. Gurney in the Wistful ‘Final Follies’ by Ben Brantley

This bill of short comedies, early and late, allows fans of Gurney to chart the evolution of theater’s foremost chronicler of a waning caste.

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Monday, October 8, 2018

For Aasif Mandvi, a 20-Year-Old Play Now Feels Like ‘Political Resistance’ by Robin Pogrebin

“Sakina’s Restaurant,” which put him on the map, has new resonance, which is why he’s summoning the energy to play all its roles all over again.

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Critic’s Notebook: How Chicago Is Changing Theater, One Storefront at a Time by Jesse Green

Can tiny companies thrive in the shadow of major institutions? In this theater-mad city, the question may actually run the other way.

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Sunday, October 7, 2018

Review: There’s a Dark, Golden Haze in This Reclaimed ‘Oklahoma!’ by Jesse Green and Ben Brantley

A stripped-down, communal version of the 1943 musical reveals a great complex work of theater, with chili and cornbread included.

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Review: In ‘Evolution of Mann,’ Fumbling Cuteness Goes Only So Far by Elisabeth Vincentelli

An aspiring musical-theater writer is on the hunt for Ms. Right in this familiar romantic comedy.

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Saturday, October 6, 2018

Montserrat Caballé, Revered Spanish Prima Donna, Dies at 85 by Margalit Fox

One of the 20th century’s most renowned opera singers, the soprano was known for the timeless beauty of her voice and the ardent fervor of her fans.

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Friday, October 5, 2018

Roger Robinson, Who Tackled August Wilson Roles, Dies at 78 by Neil Genzlinger

He won a Tony Award for his work in the 2009 revival of Mr. Wilson’s “Joe Turner’s Come and Gone,” his seventh and final Broadway appearance.

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