Friday, August 11, 2017

What to See in Movie Theatres This Weekend by Anthony Lane

The New Yorker’s film critics Anthony Lane and Richard Brody offer quick takes on current theatrical releases, like “Detroit,” “Whose Streets?,” and “Columbus.”

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Saturday, August 5, 2017

Secret Mall Turns to a Talking Dinosaur for Musical Inspiration on “Ye by Matthew Trammell

Matthew Trammell on the band Secret Mall, which has recently put out its first EP, “YeEP.”

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Friday, August 4, 2017

What to See in Movie Theatres This Weekend by Anthony Lane

Richard Brody and Anthony Lane offer quick takes on current theatrical releases, including “Dunkirk,” “Girls Trip,” “Columbus,” “Lady Macbeth,” and more.

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Friday, July 28, 2017

What to See in Movie Theatres This Weekend by Anthony Lane

Recommendations on current films, including “Dunkirk,” “Girls Trip,” “Lady Macbeth,” “Person to Person,” and “War for the Planet of the Apes.”

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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Touring Jim Henson’s Restless Creative Spirit, at the Museum of the Moving Image by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman on the new permanent Jim Henson exhibition at the Museum of the Moving Image, in Astoria, Queens.

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Monday, July 24, 2017

The Uncertain Musical Legacy of Merle Haggard by David Cantwell

David Cantwell on the country musician Merle Haggard, who died in 2016, and the brevity of musical influence.

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Not So Fast, Canada! by Bruce McCall

Suddenly, after a hundred and fifty years of “Who the hell cares?,” Canada is hot. O.K., granted, “Come from Away” just copped a Tony—but what about all the Canadian shows that hav…

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Friday, July 21, 2017

What to See in Movie Theatres This Weekend by Anthony Lane

Richard Brody and Anthony Lane offer quick takes on current theatrical releases, including “Girls Trip,” “Lady Macbeth,” “Spider-Man: Homecoming,” and “The Big Sick.”

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Daily Cartoon: Friday, July 21st by Mike Twohy

Mike Twohy’s Daily Cartoon shows a jester in a royal court.

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Maintenance Log: Disney Hall of Presidents, August, 2017 by Cullen Crawford

Cullen Crawford imagines the humorous records of a maintenance worker caring for the Donald Trump animatron at Disney World.

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Friday, July 7, 2017

What to Stream This Weekend: Five Movies That Are Almost Musicals by Richard Brody

Richard Brody recommends five films to stream this weekend, such as “American Gigolo,” starring Richard Gere, which is available on HBO Go.

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Friday, June 30, 2017

“Assassins”: Vaudeville of Political Bloodlust by Michael Schulman

Stephen Sondheim and John Weidman’s musical draws out what’s scary and silly about America’s armed malcontents.

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Monday, June 19, 2017

An Activist for New York’s Mom-and-Pop Shops by Michael Schulman

For the past ten years, a pseudonymous blogger has been writing Vanishing New York, chronicling the demises of beloved spots. Now he’s ready to unmask himself.

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Tuesday, June 13, 2017

The 2017 Tony Awards: Lost in Spacey by Michael Schulman

Who says that theatre can’t cause a ruckus? On Sunday, as CBS was teasing “Broadway’s biggest night,” controversy was engulfing the Public Theatre’s production of “Julius Caesar,…

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Sunday, June 11, 2017

Brigitte Lacombe’s Behind-the-Scenes Photos of Iconic Theatre Performances - The New Yorker by Michael Schulman

Over the years, Lacombe has captured such iconic performers as Alec Baldwin, Meryl Streep, Denzel Washington, and Madonna (during the singer’s volatile marriage to Sean Penn).

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Saturday, June 10, 2017

Brigitte Lacombe’s Behind-the-Scenes Photos of Iconic Theatre Performances by Michael Schulman

Actors are, by definition, an exhibitionist bunch. But they can also be deeply protective of a process that requires them to dive inside themselves before resurfacing with pearls of performa…

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Friday, June 9, 2017

New Tony Award Categories by Bizzy Coy

Best Direction by a Woman—Just Kidding, This Category Will Be Replaced by a Montage from “Annie II: Hip-Hop Don’t Stop (Singing About 2morrow) Featuring D.J. Daddy Big Buckz”

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Wednesday, June 7, 2017

The Public Theatre at Fifty: “A Machine for Making Community” by Rebecca Mead

The stage of the Delacorte Theatre, in Central Park, was glistening on Monday evening with what remained of an earlier rainfall, while the sky overhead was heavy and gray. These were not the…

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Monday, June 5, 2017

How Different—and Dangerous—Is Terrorism Today? by Robin Wright

On Sunday, just hours after three men launched an assault on London Bridge, British Prime Minister Theresa May stepped in front of 10 Downing Street and told the world, “We believe we a…

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Monday, May 29, 2017

Thousand-Pound Bronzes on the Upper West Side by Paige Williams

The sculptor Joy Brown creates enormous bronze humanoid figures, and, on a recent Monday night, nine of them arrived in the city on flatbed trucks, to be installed on the Upper West Side. Th…

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Friday, May 26, 2017

Weekly Culture Review: Tragedy at an Ariana Grande Concert, and More by Vinson Cunningham

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Tuesday, May 23, 2017

A Soft and Vulnerable Moment at Ariana Grande’s Manchester Concert, Destroyed by Terror by Amanda Petrusich

As we heard the news from Manchester, it was hard not to feel especially devastated by the age of Ariana Grande’s fans: the youngest confirmed victim, Saffie Rose Roussos, was just eight y…

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Friday, May 19, 2017

Elizabeth Marvel’s Authority Figures by Michael Schulman

“I’ve never been a girl-woman,” Elizabeth Marvel said recently. “I’ve always been a Woman with a capital ‘W.’ ” With her deep timbre and penetrating eyes, the forty-seven-ye…

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Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Listen to Mark Mulcahy by Sarah Larson

Mark Mulcahy is the kind of musician that people proselytize about; several years ago, I started doing it myself. He’s has had a long and varied career—with his band Miracle Legion, beg…

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Monday, May 15, 2017

The Feminist Consultants for “A Doll’s House, Part 2” by Michael Schulman

“A woman cannot be herself in the society of the present day, which is an exclusively masculine society,” Henrik Ibsen wrote in 1878, proving himself, in 2017 parlance, to be a woke bae.…

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Friday, May 12, 2017

With Her Eerily Timely “Indecent,” Paula Vogel Unsettles American Theatre Again by Daniel Pollack-Pelzner

When the Yiddish writer Sholem Asch presented his play “God of Vengeance” at a Warsaw salon in 1906, his mentor, I. L. Peretz, told him to burn it. It’s a shtetl tragedy: a Jewish brot…

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Summer Theatre Preview by Michael Schulman

Among the signifiers of a New York summer—the Mister Softee jingle, air-conditioner droplets messing up your hair—is the sound of blank verse. Shakespeare has become a mostly May-to-Augu…

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Monday, May 8, 2017

Revisiting Florine Stettheimer’s Place in Art History by Peter Schjeldahl

This is a good time to take Florine Stettheimer seriously. The occasion is a retrospective of the New York artist, poet, designer, and Jazz Age saloniste, at the Jewish Museum, titled “Flo…

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Friday, May 5, 2017

The Musical Eccentric Who Turned Tolstoy’s Pierre Into Every Seeker by Michael Schulman

Imagine writing yourself the role of a lifetime, only to be replaced by a photogenic, puppy-eyed celebrity version of yourself. Such was the fate of Dave Malloy, the writer, composer, and or…

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Unfussy Southern-European Fare at Monroe by Becky Cooper

“Twenty years ago, Brooklyn was the Wild West. Now if you want grimy you come here,” a bar-side patron explained. He was talking about Monroe, the latest offering in the area, south of M…

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