Saturday, July 15, 2017

Alvin Ailey Dance Troupe Brings Dance Education To Paris' Underserved Communities by Eleanor Beardsley

When the famed Alvin Ailey dance troupe tours, they do community outreach. This summer they're in Paris, holding classes for disadvantaged, young dancers.

Linked From National Public Radio at 06:06PM
Thursday, July 13, 2017

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Monday, July 10, 2017

From Injury To Recovery, A Ballerina Fought To Retire On Her Own Terms by Terry Gross

Wendy Whelan feared she would never dance again after undergoing hip surgery. The documentary Restless Creature chronicles her recovery and final performance with the New York City Ballet.

Linked From National Public Radio at 08:18PM
Friday, July 7, 2017

Cirque Du Soleil Buys Blue Man Group by Rose Friedman

Two of the most successful live performance franchises are joining forces. Cirque du Soleil announced that it is buying Blue Man Group.

Linked From National Public Radio at 06:06AM
Wednesday, July 5, 2017

Playwright Edward Albee's Incomplete Works May Never See The Light Of Day by Jeff Lunden

Albee died in 2016, and in his will he asked that all his incomplete manuscripts be destroyed — including a play that was supposed to open off-Broadway.

Linked From National Public Radio at 11:04PM
Saturday, July 1, 2017

How 'Fiddler On The Roof' (And Writing Its Sequel) Helped An Actress Find Closure by Michel Martin

Alexandra Silber's father died when she was just 18 — the same age as Fiddler's Hodel when she leaves her dad at a train station. Silber's new novel, After Anatevka, tells the rest of Hode…

Linked From National Public Radio at 07:06PM

'These Kids Are Insane': Jimmy Awards Celebrate Outstanding Teen Performers by Jeff Lunden

Seventy-four high school singers, actors and dancers, selected from a pool of 50,000 students across America, recently came to New York City for a Broadway boot camp.

Linked From National Public Radio at 01:04PM
Friday, June 30, 2017

Broadway Chanteuse Barbara Cook: 'My First Memories Are Of Singing'

After starring in Broadway shows like The Music Man and Candide, Cook struggled with addiction, then staged a successful second career as a cabaret singer. Originally broadcast June 27, 2016.

Linked From National Public Radio at 05:33PM
Friday, June 23, 2017

Shakespeare Companies Suffer Backlash After 'Julius Caesar' Controversy by Hady Mawajdeh

The uproar over the New York Shakespeare in the Park production of Julius Caesar has spread to other cities. And it appears to be only because they are companies with the word "Shakespeare" …

Linked From National Public Radio at 07:04PM
Monday, June 19, 2017

Julius Caesar Production Closes, But Debate Over Art And Politics Likely to Rage On by Vanessa Romo

A production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar has drawn the ire of conservatives for its depiction of President Trump as the ill-fated Roman politician.

Linked From National Public Radio at 09:06AM
Sunday, June 18, 2017

Julius Caesar Production Closes, But Debate Over Art And Politics Likely to Rage On by Vanessa Romo

A production of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar that ends Sunday has drawn the ire of conservatives for its depiction of President Trump as the ill-fated Roman politician.

Linked From National Public Radio at 08:24AM
Saturday, June 17, 2017

'1984' Comes To Broadway And 'It's Not An Easy Evening' by Jeff Lunden

George Orwell's dystopia returned to bestseller lists after the inauguration. "It's quite something to bring it to New York now, in this political climate," says adaptation co-author Duncan …

Linked From National Public Radio at 02:04PM
Friday, June 16, 2017

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'Wonder Woman' And The Tony Awards by Linda Holmes

This week, we talk about the superhero smash Wonder Woman, and we talk about Dear Evan Hansen, Oslo and some of the other big winners from Sunday night's Tonys.

Linked From National Public Radio at 01:04PM

Atop Ancient Ruins, A Rock Opera About Emperor Nero Leaves Some Romans Unimpressed by Sylvia Poggioli

A new musical seeks to present a different side of the emperor, known best for fiddling while Rome burned. But some historians object to what they see as the commercialization of Roman herit…

Linked From National Public Radio at 06:54AM
Monday, June 12, 2017

Sponsors Pull Support For 'Julius Caesar' That Seems To Depict Trump by Jeff Lunden

Delta pulled its sponsorship of New York City's Public Theater over a production of Julius Caesar that seems to depict an assassination of President Trump.

Linked From National Public Radio at 10:33PM

Delta, BofA Drop Support For 'Julius Caesar' That Looks Too Much Like Trump by Laurel Wamsley

A New York production's Caesar has blond hair, a fondness for long ties and a wife who speaks with a Slavic accent. Delta said the assassination tale "crossed the line on the standards of go…

Linked From National Public Radio at 04:06PM
Sunday, June 11, 2017

Stage Managers: You Can't See Them, But Couldn't See A Show Without Them by Jeff Lunden

Off in the wings, stage managers coordinate cast and crew, calling hundreds of cues during Broadway performances. They may not win Tony Awards, but without them, not even the curtain would g…

Linked From National Public Radio at 08:33AM
Saturday, June 10, 2017

'The Great Comet': 'Hits All Of The Checkmarks' Of A Broadway Experience by Maquita Peters

NPR's Michel Martin speaks with director Rachel Chavkin and actress Denée Benton of Broadway's Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812, which retells Tolstoy's War and Peace with a divers…

Linked From National Public Radio at 08:12PM
Saturday, June 3, 2017

This Play Was Inspired By A Real Refugee's Shakespearean Dilemma by Dan Weissman

Shedrick Yarkpai escaped war-torn Liberia under an assumed name, which he kept as he started a new life in Australia. Objects in the Mirror follows Yarkpai's struggle to reclaim his identity.

Linked From National Public Radio at 12:42PM
Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Why A Theater Director Made A 'Color-Conscious Choice' In 'Virginia Woolf' Casting by Jeff Lunden

A small theater in Portland, Ore., cast an African-American actor in Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? But the Albee estate wouldn't grant the rights to produce the 1962 play.

Linked From National Public Radio at 04:24PM

In NYC, Activism Begins With Lessons In Theater by Roxana Saberi

Wielding techniques from the global Theatre of the Oppressed movement used to train activists, one group challenges people to think beyond labels.

Linked From National Public Radio at 04:24PM
Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Cole Porter's Pro-Immigration Ballet Gets A Trump-Era Revival by Deb Amos

Within the Quota criticized the restrictive immigration laws passed by Congress after World War I. Now the Princeton University Ballet has brought the show back — with a few updates.

Linked From National Public Radio at 10:05PM

Dina Merrill, Actress, Heiress And Philanthropist, Dies At 93 by Doreen McCallister

Merrill, the daughter of Wall Street broker E.F. Hutton and cereal heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, went on to become a leading lady in movies. She died Monday at her home in East Hampton…

Linked From National Public Radio at 09:42AM
Thursday, May 18, 2017

Asian Americans In Hollywood Still Waiting For The Spotlight by Leah Donnella

In the meantime, some are producing their own shows or creating material for alternative platforms like YouTube.

Linked From National Public Radio at 05:06PM

Josh Groban Leaves Big Shoes To Fill In The Tony-Nominated 'Great Comet' by Elizabeth Blair

For his role as Pierre, Groban had to be able to play the accordion while navigating multiple sets of stairs. His replacement, Okieriete Onaodowan, has about two months to master the instrum…

Linked From National Public Radio at 11:05AM
Sunday, May 14, 2017

Soul Queen Of New Orleans Has Been Performing On Mother's Day For 35 Years

In a New Orleans tradition dating back almost 35 years, soul singer Irma Thomas takes the stage at the Audubon Zoo to perform a special concert for fans on Mother's Day.

Linked From National Public Radio at 08:42PM
Sunday, May 7, 2017

When It Comes To Family Musicals, Kids' Opinions Matter More Than Critics' by Jeff Lunden

Normally, critical reviews can kill a Broadway show, but not so for kid-focused musicals. Anastasia and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory are currently on Broadway, vying for the kid seal of…

Linked From National Public Radio at 08:12PM
Tuesday, May 2, 2017

The Tony Nominations: 'The Great Comet,' 'Dolly,' And 'A Doll's House' by Linda Holmes

The Tony nominations are out, and unlike last year, there's no founding-fathers-shaped giant absorbing the oxygen.

Linked From National Public Radio at 04:02PM
Monday, May 1, 2017

'Indecent': A Play About A Yiddish Play That Was Ahead Of Its Time by Jeff Lunden

A new Broadway production takes audiences through the history of Sholem Asch's 1907 Yiddish play God of Vengeance, about a Jewish brothel owner whose daughter falls in love with a woman.

Linked From National Public Radio at 09:12PM
Saturday, April 29, 2017

'Indecent': A Play About A Play by Jeff Lunden

Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Paula Vogel is using a controversial Yiddish play more than a hundred years old as the basis for her first Broadway production.

Linked From National Public Radio at 12:48PM
Friday, April 28, 2017

Actor John Leguizamo's Career Goal: To Give Latino Kids Their Own Heroes by Christina Cala

"I was growing up and maturing at a time where we were invisible," he says. " ... And I always wanted to be able to make Latin kids like myself feel more than."

Linked From National Public Radio at 05:18PM