All stories by Sarah Larson on BroadwayStars

Monday, January 28, 2019

The Chaos of American Manhood in “True West” by Sarah Larson

Ethan Hawke and Paul Dano star in Sam Shepard’s legendary play about fathers, competition, and male angst, Sarah Larson writes.

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Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Listen to Mark Mulcahy by Sarah Larson

Mark Mulcahy is the kind of musician that people proselytize about; several years ago, I started doing it myself. He’s has had a long and varied career—with his band Miracle Legion, beg…

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Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Ars Nova’s Brilliant Career by Sarah Larson

On a Monday night this winter, at a gala in a Beaux-Arts former bank downtown, the young playwright Rachel Bonds, whose luminous “Sundown, Yellow Moon” is currently onstage uptown, made …

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Friday, October 21, 2016

A “Rocky Horror” for the “High School Musical” Generation by Sarah Larson

The network-TV pop musical, usually performed live, has picked up steam in recent years, with unnerving results. Watching Christopher Walken fop sleepily through “Hook’s Tango” or Carr…

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Monday, August 22, 2016

Isaac Oliver: Reading as Cabaret by Sarah Larson

On a Friday night in June at Joe’s Pub, at the Public Theatre, as the writer and performer Isaac Oliver’s show began, an announcement came over the P.A. system: “Isaac Oliver will be p…

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Monday, August 17, 2015

Better Living Through Podcasts by Sarah Larson

One of the pleasures of the portrait-in-greatness podcast—“WTF with Marc Maron” and many dozens of others, multiplying all the time—is the dual presentation of culture and character,…

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Wednesday, March 25, 2015

Uptown Rapture: Debbie Harry at the Carlyle by Sarah Larson

The idea of most pop artists performing at the Café Carlyle—the intimate, elegant cabaret space at the Carlyle Hotel—wouldn’t make intuitive sense, but the idea of Debbie Harry singin…

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Friday, December 5, 2014

“Peter Pan Live!” and a Night of Protests by Sarah Larson

In a week when flying off to Neverland held some appeal but lovely thoughts were hard to come by, NBC, at long last, aired “Peter Pan Live!,” a three-hour performance, months in the hypi…

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Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Beyond “Freaky Friday”: An Appreciation of Mary Rodgers by Sarah Larson

You might be a bigger Mary Rodgers fan than you realize.

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Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Of Mice and Franco by Sarah Larson

James Franco and Chris O’Dowd discuss their roles in “Of Mice and Men” with a team of Steinbeck experts.

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Friday, November 29, 2013

Mann and Weil on Broadway by Sarah Larson

The composer Barry Mann and the lyricist Cynthia Weil were in town to see “Beautiful: The Carole King Musical on Broadway.”

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Thursday, May 30, 2013

“Gatz” Sees “Gatsby” by Sarah Larson

Last Thursday evening, twenty members of Elevator Repair Service, the downtown theatre company, met at a multiplex in Times Square, collected twenty pairs of 3-D glasses, took escalators to …

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Friday, April 26, 2013

The Rascals on Broadway by Sarah Larson

Last Tuesday night was the opening of “The Rascals: Once Upon a Dream,” a Broadway reunion of the New Jersey rock band that broke up in 1970.

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Monday, April 8, 2013

Elaine Stritch’s Long Goodbye by Sarah Larson

On Friday evening at the Café Carlyle, before the second-to-last performance of “Elaine Stritch at the Carlyle: Movin’ Over and Out,” Stritch’s farewell show, th…

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Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Manilow Lovefest on Broadway by Sarah Larson

There he was: Barry Manilow, sixty-nine years old, spiffy in a black dinner jacket, black pants, and white shirt; hair moussed and mussed; face lifted. His expression was one of joy. He wave…

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