Tuesday, April 11, 2017

Review: Dark Corners, Battersea Arts Centre by Katie Walsh

We’re all presented with a blank canvas in our life, a blank sheet to create our own story, with the opportunity to build and form our life narrative. Dark Corners presents the story of 13…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 11:42AM

Review: It Is So Ordered, Pleasance Theatre by Lucy Streeten

‘Freedom, courage, and persistence’: central to the American Civil Rights Movement of the ‘60s, these currents also coursed strongly through the new arrival of It is So Ordered at the …

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 11:42AM

Review: The Winter’s Tale, Silk Street Theatre by Katie Walsh

In a clinical kingdom on dark grey and blues, King Leontes reveals his suspicions of his Queen’s fidelity with his brother; which in true Shakespearean fashion means one misunderstanding h…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 10:36AM

Review: Out of Blixen, The Print Room by Camilla Gurtler

After a heatwave of Nordic Noir over the past few years, it makes my Danish heart flutter that the Print Room has decided to celebrate Karen Blixen, one of our greatest storytellers and an a…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 10:36AM

Review: Finders Keepers, Park Theatre by Dan Rubins

Among the knickknacks piled high in Mr. Pharaoh’s junkyard, there is a broken clock, frozen in time. And while this clock doesn’t stand out among the eclectic ingenuities surrounding it …

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 10:36AM
Monday, April 10, 2017

Review: Run, The Place by Alice Devoy

Run by the 2faced Dance Company is, in fact, a collection of three different pieces: all emotive, potent and wholly individual. The opening piece, which is also the longest, is entitled ‘F…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 07:12AM

Review: I Capture the Castle, Watford Palace Theatre by Dan Rubins

“I write this sitting in the kitchen sink,” begins young Cassandra Mortmain in Dodie Smith’s much-beloved novel I Capture the Castle. Composer Steven Edis and librettist Teresa Howard,…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 07:12AM

Review: The Goat, or Who is Sylvia?, Theatre Royal Haymarket by Jessica Handscomb

Modern drama, for me, often evokes the same reaction as modern art does. I consume it, I often enjoy it, but I also am left wondering ‘why?’. Why would someone make something like that? …

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 07:12AM
Sunday, April 9, 2017

Review: Consent, National Theatre by Jessica Handscomb

Nina Raine, writer of well received Tiger Country and Olivier-nominated Tribes, is back with a fiercely witty new play that brings the politics of the courtroom into everyday life. Consent f…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 06:02AM
Saturday, April 8, 2017

Blog: Why rural theatre is thriving by Jack Bond

Audience numbers for professional shows in rural UK venues are growing, according to new figures from the National Rural Touring Forum (NRTF). Jack Bond, who works for the organisation, alon…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 12:24PM
Thursday, April 6, 2017

Review: Jewels, Royal Opera House by Manuel Muñoz

Now celebrating its 50th anniversary, George Balanchine’s Jewels comes back to the stage giving plenty of opportunities for the whole company to show their skills off. This collection of t…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 05:54AM

Review: Posh, Pleasance Theatre by Josephine Balfour-Oatts

Notorious for its depiction of ‘The Riot Club’, a fictional, all-male society loosely-based on Oxford University’s infamous Bullingdon Club, Laura Wade’s Posh returns to the stage …

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 05:54AM
Monday, April 3, 2017

Review: Gabriel, Richmond Theatre by Katie Walsh

In Nazi occupied Guernsey, Jeanne Becquet is faced with the hard task of protecting her exuberant and dysfunctional family with her Jewish daughter in-law Lily and daughter Estelle. With the…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 05:12PM

Review: Tejas Verdes, Ugly Duck by Dan Rubins

Director Emily Louizou has found the perfect space for Tejas Verdes, Fermín Cabal’s 2004 collection of seven haunting monologues surrounding the disappearance, torture, and death of a you…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 01:54PM

Review: Natives, Southwark Playhouse by Lydia Lakemoore

Natives is a new written piece by Glenn Waldron that follows three teenagers on one day of their lives – their fourteenth birthday. Coldly but aptly named A, B, and C, these characters col…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 12:48PM

Review: Don Juan in Soho, Wyndham’s Theatre by Annie Starkey

Soho serves once more as the backdrop for this new version of Patrick Marber’s previous ‘loose adaptation’ of Moliere’s tragicomedy Don Juan. Not much has changed since 2006’s vers…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 06:12AM

Review: The Poetry of Exile, White Bear Theatre by Josephine Balfour-Oatts

Previously known for works such as Basildon (2009), Bridlington (2015) and Playground (2016), writer Peter Hamilton returns to The White Bear Theatre in Kennington with his most recent play:…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 06:12AM
Thursday, March 30, 2017

Review: Ballistic, Mirth Marvel and Maud by Manuel Muñoz

In May 2014, Elliot Rodger killed several people at a university campus before shooting himself. In what were subsequently known as the Isla Vista killings, six people were killed and fourte…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 06:12AM
Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Review: Dog Ends, Tabard Theatre by Josephine Balfour-Oatts

Originally broadcast as part of the BBC’s ‘Play for Today’ series in 1984, Dog Ends by Richard Harris is a black comedy set in the living room of a family home in East London. Harris h…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 05:54AM

Review: Madama Butterfly, Royal Opera House by Manuel Muñoz

Madama Butterfly is one of the most performed operas ever, as it has en enduring appeal due of its themes of love, loss, dignity and deceit. Reaching new heights of realistic exoticism, Pucc…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 04:48AM
Monday, March 27, 2017

Review: The Chemsex Monologues, King’s Head Theatre by Daniel Perks

The Chemsex Monologues is not a poster production – it does not preach of the dangers that this ever-growing scene is obviously intimately entwined with, nor does it paint a rosy picture o…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 08:36AM

Review: Undermined, Wilton’s Music Hall by Lydia Lakemoore

Political theatre can be somewhat consuming with a thin line between conveying a message and attempting to shove an entire ideology down one’s throat in the mere space of an hour. Much to …

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 07:32AM
Sunday, March 26, 2017

Review: Dark Vanilla Jungle, Theatre N16 by Daniel Perks

It feels fictional but never absurdist, outlandish but never untenable. Andrea’s (Emily Thornton) situation is shocking and slightly outrageous, but is ultimately believable. Philip Ridley…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 04:24PM

Review: After Party, Pleasance Theatre by India-Inés Levy

In a world ruined from the Holocaust, nuclear warfare, post-fact politics, artificial intelligence, climate change, the erosion of rights to privacy, the increasing polarization of society, …

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 03:18PM
Friday, March 24, 2017

Review: The Frogs, Jermyn Street Theatre by Dan Rubins

“You can stop rhyming right there,” the Greek god of wine and drama Dionysos commands his slave Xanthias mid-song in Stephen Sondheim’s musical adaptation of The Frogs, now making its …

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 01:42PM

Review: La Cage aux Folles, New Wimbledon Theatre by Katie Walsh

Herman and Fierstein’s La Cage aux Folles was, when it first premiered, a risque and outrageous show which brought with it a rebellious and brave statement for homosexuality and expression…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 12:24PM
Thursday, March 23, 2017

Offer: Get £5 tickets to Boat at Battersea Arts Centre by Laura Phillips

Under 26s get £5 tickets to Boat by Company Three Boat | Battersea Arts Centre | 5 – 8 April It’s easy to spot a freshie. Like maybe some people – like lawyers or po…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 07:18PM

Review: Boxman, The Albany by Daniel Perks

In arguably the most challenging production seen at the festival so far, Boxman is a one-man show. The 45 minutes focussed on Ringo (Reice Weathers), a homeless man who fled from his war-str…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 06:03AM

Review: An American in Paris, Dominion Theatre by Manuel Muñoz

After his successes as a choreographer for The Royal Ballet – Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, The Winter’s Tale – Christopher Wheeldon is now bringing his first Broadway adventure …

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 06:03AM

Review: Captain Amazing, The Albany by Daniel Perks

Captain Amazing is the story of a superhero and a puppet. Like all good stories, it needs a good guy and a bad guy, a villain hellbent on destroying the world with his nuclear missile. Mark …

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 06:03AM

Review: After Liverpool, The Albany by Daniel Perks

After Liverpool has nothing to do with the city in North West England – it’s best to reveal that detail straightaway so there are no misconceptions of scousers with their hair in rollers…

Linked From A Younger Theatre at 06:03AM