All stories by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic on BroadwayStars

Tuesday, July 17, 2018

Brendan Healy takes over as Canadian Stage artistic director by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Finding a talented local with a resumé full of inclusion and collaboration does much to help theatre company move forward and address past criticism, writes Carly Maga.

Linked From Toronto Star at 05:00PM

Sting will star in Toronto premiere of his musical The Last Ship by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

A new version of the musical about a town devastated by the decline of northeastern England’s shipbuilding industry and the looming closure of the Swan Hunter shipyard is coming in early 2…

Linked From Toronto Star at 06:00AM
Saturday, July 14, 2018

Revival of Broadway classic The King and I can’t avoid it’s problematic past by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Bartlett Sher’s production of the Broadway Classic The King and I, presented in Toronto by Mirvish Theatre, makes a valiant effort to deliver a polished, old-fashioned musical for audience…

Linked From Toronto Star at 04:48PM
Tuesday, June 26, 2018

In Two Birds One Stone two friends, one Jewish, one Palestinian, tell their stories and try not to get too political by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

In the play, Greenblatt embarks upon a birthright trip to Israel. Jabr, feeling oppressed in Nablus, seeks several paths out of Palestinian territory, writes Carly Maga.

Linked From Toronto Star at 05:19PM
Sunday, June 24, 2018

Shaw Festival’s Chekhov-inspired familial tale builds a legacy of its own by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Sarena Parmar’s first produced play, The Orchard (After Checkhov), will frame future viewings of Checkhov’s original work.

Linked From Toronto Star at 02:05PM
Friday, June 22, 2018

The Baroness and the Pig’s education story should’ve been held back by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

The friendship at the heart of the story isn’t believable, dooming this Shaw Festival production, writes Carly Maga

Linked From Toronto Star at 03:33PM
Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Illusions, mind-bending and fine dining meld into a magical show by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Scottish illusionist Scott Silven awes in At the Illusionist’s Table, which runs in Casa Loma twice daily throughout the run of Luminato.

Linked From Toronto Star at 07:57PM
Tuesday, June 12, 2018
Saturday, June 9, 2018

The Phantom of the Opera’s charm is unshakable three decades later by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

The beloved story is back in Toronto at the Princess of Wales Theatre.

Linked From Toronto Star at 04:10PM
Monday, June 4, 2018

To Kill a Mockingbird digs for a deeper Atticus Finch at Stratford Festival by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Great performances from adults and kids alike elevate a production that doesn’t quite reach its noble goal of updating Harper Lee’s classic story for 2018.

Linked From Toronto Star at 03:39PM
Saturday, June 2, 2018

An Ideal Husband’s lightheartedness, choreographed transitions make for enjoyable take on Oscar Wilde’s comedy by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Director Lezlie Wade’s mantra at the Stratford Festival this year seems to be clarity, precision and fun. Despite the gravity of the story, her production of the 1889 play keeps its light …

Linked From Toronto Star at 04:48PM
Thursday, May 31, 2018

Long Day’s Journey into Night’s excellent cast can’t quite quicken its pace at Stratford Festival by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

The first act crackles in Miles Potter’s production, but then the fog of Eugene O’Neill’s moody masterpiece starts to set in, writes Carly Maga.

Linked From Toronto Star at 02:16PM

Gregory Prest masters the high art of playing the fool in Soulpepper’s La Bête by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

David Hirson’s 1991 rhyming comedy becomes more than a cautionary tale in Tanja Jacobs’ gender-balanced production.

Linked From Toronto Star at 12:35PM
Saturday, May 26, 2018

Music Music Life Death Music blends story with song in new ‘absurd’ production by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

One Little Goat’s latest production keeps in line with theatre’s penchant for off-kilter stories and speeches, trading realism for poetic rhythms and metaphors.

Linked From Toronto Star at 07:22PM
Friday, May 25, 2018

There’s a disconnect between frivolous and sombre moments in Shaw Festival’s Grand Hotel by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Production about strangers intersecting at a luxury hotel in 1928 has an almost lethal dose of cynicism, writes Carly Maga.

Linked From Toronto Star at 01:38PM
Sunday, May 6, 2018

LULU v. 7 reimagines retrograde treatment of women’s sexuality by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

In engaging with Frank Wedekind’s work, co-creators Susanna Fournier, ted witzel and Helen Yung work through anger to find love on the other side.

Linked From Toronto Star at 12:00AM
Monday, April 30, 2018

Annie’s optimism for ‘Tomorrow’ aims for relevance today by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Though the plucky orphan girl’s sunny disposition might clash with modern cynicism, Annie is still the earworm musical fans know and love, writes Carly Maga.

Linked From Toronto Star at 10:49AM
Friday, April 27, 2018

Evan Placey’s play Girls Like That is intoxicating but also frustrating by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

With all its wonderful elements, it’s a shame Placey ends the play with a sombre estimation of female friendship

Linked From Toronto Star at 11:21AM
Tuesday, April 24, 2018

London’s Grand Theatre has grand ambitions by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Artistic director Dennis Garnhum of the London, Ont., theatre keeps going bigger and better. Up next: seats have been removed to recreate a racetrack for Chariots of Fire.

Linked From Toronto Star at 10:00AM
Wednesday, April 18, 2018

There’s no place like Fun Home by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

In a new Canadian production, the heartfelt musical brings Alison Bechdel’s memoir about growing up in a funeral home vividly to life, writes Carly Maga.

Linked From Toronto Star at 06:59PM
Friday, April 13, 2018

This is an identity play that leaves you wondering whose identity it’s about by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Jivesh Parasram’s Take d Milk, Nah? speaks to the divide between the mainstream and the marginalized in a bold way.

Linked From Toronto Star at 05:36PM
Thursday, April 12, 2018

Category E’s performers and script make for potent cage match by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Director and actors dig into playwright Belinda Cornish’s creation, complete with its broad animal-experimentation metaphor.

Linked From Toronto Star at 11:51AM
Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Here’s Storefront Theatre’s response to sexism, racism, homophobia and more: the Feminist F--k It Fest by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

New theatre festival takes on reproductive health, sexual harassment and assault, sexist and racist stereotypes and more April 11 to 22.

Linked From Toronto Star at 10:00AM
Saturday, April 7, 2018

Confusion stifles the intentions of Mixie and the Halfbreeds by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

The script aims to address issues of mixed identities, but it moves too quickly and leaves the audience behind.

Linked From Toronto Star at 05:32PM
Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Two women, two views about mixed race identity. Together they created Mixie and the Halfbreeds by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Adrienne Wong and Julie Tamiko Manning put their differing views of their mixed heritages into their play, opening April 3 in Toronto.

Linked From Toronto Star at 01:29PM
Thursday, March 22, 2018

This Les Misérables without music has powerful moments, but others miss their mark by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Overall, the production is missing the typical Theatre Smith-Gilmour wit and physical invention, writes Carly Maga.

Linked From Toronto Star at 02:31PM
Saturday, March 17, 2018

Desire for comedy trumps message in Soulpepper adaptation of Orwell classic Animal Farm by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Anthony MacMahon’s version of the middle-school staple, directed by Ravi Jain, turns George Orwell’s drama into a comedy. Despite some strong performances, the play veers into unwieldly …

Linked From Toronto Star at 01:59PM
Friday, March 16, 2018

Jani Lauzon’s version of The Monument is about more than a rapist and his saviour by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Mejra’s decision to save Stetko’s life and make him her dependant reflects how Canada’s Indigenous people must continue to live with systems and people that hurt them.

Linked From Toronto Star at 06:11PM
Wednesday, March 14, 2018

The confessions of 1920s housewives are at the heart of What a Young Wife Ought to Know by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Playwright Hannah Moscovitch finds herself increasingly drawn to authentic stories about female experience.

Linked From Toronto Star at 10:00AM
Tuesday, February 27, 2018

Nina Lee Aquino and her cast bring new perspectives to Canadian theatre classic The Drawer Boy by Carly Maga - Theatre Critic

Filipino-Canadian director cast Black and Ojibwa actors in Theatre Passe Muraille production about an actor living with two farmers to research a play.

Linked From Toronto Star at 02:02PM
Saturday, February 24, 2018