All stories by Michael Schulman on BroadwayStars

Monday, October 8, 2018

Daniel Radcliffe and the Art of the Fact-Check by Michael Schulman

Researching his role in “The Lifespan of a Fact,” the actor embeds in The New Yorker’s fact-checking department.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 05:00AM
Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Jane Fonda Is Paying Close Attention by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman interviews the actress and activist Jane Fonda about talking to voters, supporting \#MeToo, and growing into herself.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 04:18PM
Tuesday, September 18, 2018

The 2018 Emmys: Nerd Love and Hannah Gadsby Won the Night by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman writes about the 2018 Primetime Emmy awards, where a surprise marriage proposal one the night.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 07:49AM
Monday, September 17, 2018

Carrie Coon’s Existential Journey to TV Stardom by Michael Schulman

In shows such as “The Leftovers” and “Fargo,” she exudes a Midwestern pragmatism that has its own kind of mystery, Michael Schulman writes.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 05:00AM
Monday, September 10, 2018

When Bees Go Rogue, Call the N.Y.P.D. by Michael Schulman

A swarm struck Times Square. Members of an élite beekeeping squad rushed to the scene, Michael Schulman writes. 

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 05:00AM
Sunday, September 2, 2018

The Shaming of Geoffrey Owens and the Inability to See Actors as Laborers, Too by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman writes on the inability to see actors as laborers in light of the recent shaming of the actor Geoffrey Owens, of “The Cosby Show,” after he was photographed working at a…

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Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Glenn Close Grabs the Limelight in “The Wife” by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman reviews the new film “The Wife,” starring Glenn Close, and writes about the parallels between Close’s life and personality and those of the character she plays in the …

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 10:00AM
Monday, August 20, 2018

A Frog’s-Eye View of the Five Boroughs by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman on the intrepid British writer touring the city’s public and private pools on a hot summer day.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 05:00AM
Friday, August 17, 2018

Fall Preview by Michael Schulman

Superstar Vehicles, a Radical “Oklahoma!”

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Thursday, August 16, 2018

Is “Pretty Woman” on Broadway a Big Mistake? by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman reviews the newly opened Broadway musical “Pretty Woman,” at the Nederlander Theatre, starring Samantha Barks, Andy Karl, Eric Anderson, and Orfeh.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 10:42PM
Thursday, August 9, 2018

A Hollywood Hedonist Turns Ninety-Five by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman on Matt Tyrnauer’s new documentary, “Scotty and the Secret History of Hollywood,” about the nonagenarian Scotty Bowers, whose 2012 tell-all book, “Full Service,” r…

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Monday, July 30, 2018

Trapped in the Garden with Parker Posey by Michael Schulman

At her new digs in the West Village, the actress and newly minted memoirist gets locked out.

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Friday, July 27, 2018

“Head Over Heels,” Reviewed: A Trans-Positive Spin on a Sixteenth-Century Romance, with Help from the Go-Go’s by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman reviews the musical “Head Over Heels,”at the Hudson Theatre, which features the first openly transgender woman to originate a major role on Broadway.

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Saturday, July 7, 2018

The Complexities of Whitney Houston in “Whitney” by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman on “Whitney,” a new documentary about the singer Whitney Houston, directed by Kevin Macdonald.

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Monday, June 25, 2018

Bo Burnham’s Age of Anxiety by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman writes about the film “Eighth Grade,” in which the former YouTube star turns on the medium that made him famous.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 05:00AM
Friday, June 22, 2018

Encounters: Alison Brie Swaps Her Wrestling Costume for Boxing Gloves by Michael Schulman

The star of Netflix’s “GLOW,” which returns for Season 2, is not afraid of getting physical.

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Monday, June 18, 2018

Aunt Lydia’s Garden Karma by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman on the in-demand character actress Ann Dowd, and her adventures with cattle prods, nuns, and hoarders.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 05:00AM
Monday, June 11, 2018

The 2018 Tony Awards: Springsteen, Meet SpongeBob by Michael Schulman

Michael Shulman reviews the 2018 Tony Awards, which he writes did not stint on weird juxtapositions, tuneful numbers, or memorable speeches.

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Friday, June 1, 2018

Review: The Tender Biographies of “House of Nutter” by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman reviews “House of Nutter: The Rebel Tailor of Savile Row,” a new book by Lance Richardson about the brothers Tommy and David Nutter.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 09:11AM
Monday, May 28, 2018

The N.Y.P.D. Police Band Takes the Stage by Michael Schulman

At a performance of “The Band’s Visit,” on Broadway, New York’s police band jammed with the show’s Alexandria Ceremonial Police Orchestra.

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Thursday, May 24, 2018

How Interview Magazine Uplifted and Reshaped Celebrity Culture by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman writes about the folding of Interview Magazine, which was created in 1969 by the artist Andy Warhol.

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Friday, May 18, 2018

Kathleen Turner Finds Her Voice at Café Carlyle by Michael Schulman

Telling stories punctuated by standards, Turner recalls falling in love with the theatre.

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Monday, May 14, 2018

Carol Burnett Gets Woke by Michael Schulman

Now that the kids who grew up on “The Carol Burnett Show” are middle-aged, the actress is finding new fans on Netflix, Michael Schulman writes.

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Friday, May 11, 2018

Summer Theatre Preview by Michael Schulman

“Pretty Woman” comes to Broadway, Armie Hammer stars in “Straight White Men,” and Chukwudi Iwuji plays Othello in Central Park.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 05:00AM
Tuesday, May 1, 2018

The 2018 Tony Nominations: “Mean Girls,” “Harry Potter,” and Singing SpongeBob by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman writes about the 2018 Tony Award nominees, including “Mean Girls,” “Three Tall Women,” “The Iceman Cometh,” “SpongeBob SquarePants,” and others.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 03:57PM
Monday, April 30, 2018

Grace Jones, Donna Summer, and the Power of Disco by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman reviews two new projects about Grace Jones and Donna Summer—the bio-musical “Summer,” and the documentary “Grace Jones: Bloodlight and Bami.”

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 04:00PM
Friday, April 27, 2018

Finding America’s Present in England’s Revolutionary Past by Michael Schulman

In Caryl Churchill’s “Light Shining in Buckinghamshire,” the director Rachel Chavkin sees a play for the resistance.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 05:00AM
Sunday, April 8, 2018

Tina Fey’s “Mean Girls” Is Now a Fetch Broadway Musical by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman writes about Tina Fey's "Mean Girls," now a musical on Broadway.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 10:00PM
Monday, April 2, 2018

A Duet with Two Generations of “Carousel” Ballerinas by Michael Schulman

Bambi Linn, ninety-two, and Brittany Pollack, twenty-nine, discuss dancing the same role on Broadway, seventy-three years apart. Michael Schulman writes.

Linked From The New Yorker Subscription at 05:00AM
Monday, March 19, 2018

“Angels in America” Rises Again by Michael Schulman

Michael Schulman writes about Marianne Elliott as she wrestles with a notoriously difficult play, and with Tony Kushner.

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Friday, March 16, 2018

A Deaf Romance on Broadway in “Children of a Lesser God” by Michael Schulman

A revival of Mark Medoff’s Tony Award-winning play comes to Studio 54.

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